Indie News

Javier Bardem, Elle Fanning, Salma Hayek, Chris Rock & Laura Linney Set For Sally Potter Pic; HanWay & Bleecker Street Aboard

  • Deadline
Javier Bardem, Elle Fanning, Salma Hayek, Chris Rock & Laura Linney Set For Sally Potter Pic; HanWay & Bleecker Street Aboard
Javier Bardem, Elle Fanning, Salma Hayek, Chris Rock and Laura Linney lead an impressive cast for The Party and Orlando writer-director Sally Potter’s latest film. Production is underway in Spain on the untitled feature, which is being repped worldwide by HanWay and Bleecker Street.

The pic will chart a wild day in the life of a man on the edge, held together by the unconditional love of his daughter. It will also shoot on location in New York in January.

HanWay Films will handle the international sales and distribution and will commence sales at the upcoming European Film Market. Bleecker Street will distribute the film in the U.S. Potter’s long-time producing partner Christopher Sheppard is making the film through banner Adventure Pictures.

The film was co-developed by BBC Films and the BFI and is funded by HanWay Films, Bleecker Street, Ingenious Media, BBC Films, the BFI, Chimney
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Back to One, Episode 37: Disobedience Actor Alessandro Nivalo

We’re catching Alessandro Nivola at a very interesting moment in his career. A day before our talk, he was awarded Best Supporting Actor at the British Independent Film Awards for his incredible performance in Disobedience, and a few days before that it was announced that he will star in David Chase’s Sopranos prequel The Many Saints of Newark. He talks about the benefits of having time to prepare for the role of Rabbi Dovid Kuperman and facing the challenge of delivering that important climatic speech. And how, for him, inhabiting a character often starts with the voice. Plus he confesses […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Back to One, Episode 37: Disobedience Actor Alessandro Nivalo

We’re catching Alessandro Nivola at a very interesting moment in his career. A day before our talk, he was awarded Best Supporting Actor at the British Independent Film Awards for his incredible performance in Disobedience, and a few days before that it was announced that he will star in David Chase’s Sopranos prequel The Many Saints of Newark. He talks about the benefits of having time to prepare for the role of Rabbi Dovid Kuperman and facing the challenge of delivering that important climatic speech. And how, for him, inhabiting a character often starts with the voice. Plus he confesses […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon’ First Trailer: Aardman’s Beloved Flock Goes to Space

The adorable stars of Aardman Animations’ delightful smash hit “Shaun the Sheep Movie” and the popular television series of the same name are back on the big screen for another adventure in farm-based jokes, animated wizardry, and the pure joy of watching the world’s best flock engage in all manner of high jinks. And this time around, they’re going to space. No, really.

In “A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon,” the fuzzy inhabitants of Mossy Bottom Farm are about to take on more than even they can handle. Per the film’s official synopsis, “Strange lights over the quiet town of Mossingham herald the arrival of a mystery visitor from far across the galaxy… but at nearby Mossy Bottom Farm, Shaun has other things on his mind, as his mischievous schemes are continually thwarted by an exasperated Bitzer. When an impish and adorable alien with amazing powers crash-lands near Mossy Bottom Farm,
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‘Bumblebee’: ’80s Nostalgia Fuels A Comeback For The ‘Transformers’ Series [Review]

Capitalizing on the nostalgia of a beloved 1980s cartoon and toy that it never had much affection for in the first place, Michael Bay’s brand of bombastic Bayhem converted Hasbro’s “Transformers” into a successful multi-billion-dollar global franchise for Paramount. But throughout ten years, and five increasingly crude, overwrought, tuneless, and incoherent films, the series— “Transformers” only in name, really— mutated directly into an excuse for Bay to print money and blow sh*t up, while embracing the worst tendencies of toxic male aggression.

Continue reading ‘Bumblebee’: ’80s Nostalgia Fuels A Comeback For The ‘Transformers’ Series [Review] at The Playlist.
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‘Mandy’ Disqualified From the Oscars, Which Is Heartbreaking For Jóhann Jóhannsson Fans

‘Mandy’ Disqualified From the Oscars, Which Is Heartbreaking For Jóhann Jóhannsson Fans
When the Academy announces the 2019 shortlist for Best Original Score on Monday, December 17, don’t expect to see the late Jóhann Jóhannsson on the list for his exceptional “Mandy” score. The psychedelic horror film, directed by Panos Cosmatos and starring Nicolas Cage and Andrea Riseborough, has been disqualified from all Oscar races, IndieWire has confirmed with a representative for the movie. While “Mandy” was never a top contender, there was a small but passionate campaign pushing Jóhannsson’s original score (IndieWire’s chief film critic Eric Kohn was one of the more vocal supporters).

Variety reported earlier this week “Mandy” was disqualified from the Oscars because “it was released on VOD before it completed its qualifying run.” When asked to elaborate on the disqualification, a representative for the film told IndieWire a “qualifying run” means the film is released for one week in Los Angeles with a minimum of three screenings per day.
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IndieWire’s 10 Tips to Surviving the Sundance Film Festival

  • Indiewire
[Editor’s Note: This article is presented by Canada Goose.]

The Sundance Film Festival is one of the best times of the year for a cinephile, but not planning accordingly can make it a challenge. IndieWire has been covering the Park City event since our founding in 1996, so by now we know a little thing or two about what it takes to pull off a successful and enjoyable visit to the Sundance Film Festival. Next year’s Sundance kicks off Thursday, January 24. Here are the survival tips you need to keep in mind before you arrive.

1. Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate

Any journalist or moviegoer who has attended the Sundance Film Festival has probably gotten altitude sickness at least once. Park City’s high altitude means the air is thin, so getting sick or battling through headaches and shortness of breath is just the first step of many people’s Sundance experience. To combat the altitude, make sure to start
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‘Roma,’ ‘Burning,’ & ‘The Image Book’ Among Sight & Sound’s Top 20 Films Of 2018

As we post the year-end collection of publications’ Best of 2018, a few things become very clear. We begin to notice that some films appear almost on every list, and roughly in the same order. And we also are constantly surprised that some films pop up that are nowhere to be found in any other lists. This shows not only that the quality of films in 2018 is incredible, but also that there are just so many films that can be considered among the very best that this year had to offer.

Continue reading ‘Roma,’ ‘Burning,’ & ‘The Image Book’ Among Sight & Sound’s Top 20 Films Of 2018 at The Playlist.
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‘The Quake’ Is A Worthy Sequel To ‘The Wave’ & Will Leave You Shook [Review]

A thoughtful, deliberate thriller that manages to build on (rather than recycle) the success of its predecessor, “The Quake” succeeds where so many action sequels fail. Rather than just foisting the hero back into a similar hard-luck scenario to hit all the same beats again, a la “Die Hard 2,” “London Has Fallen,” or “Mission: Impossible 2,” “The Quake” invests in an examination of the characters and the fallout from the first film…before putting them all right back in the shit.

Continue reading ‘The Quake’ Is A Worthy Sequel To ‘The Wave’ & Will Leave You Shook [Review] at The Playlist.
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Jodie Foster To Direct & Star In Remake Of Recent Cannes Award Winner ‘Woman At War’

Jodie Foster To Direct & Star In Remake Of Recent Cannes Award Winner ‘Woman At War’
Despite being a two-time Oscar-winning actress, in recent years, Jodie Foster is probably best known for her work behind the camera. Over the last decade, she’s directed episodes of popular TV series “Orange is the New Black,” “House of Cards,” and “Black Mirror.” Foster has also helmed two features, including “The Beaver” and most recently, “Money Monster.” And for her next directorial project, she’s tackling a English-language remake of an acclaimed Icelandic film, where she’ll also star.

Continue reading Jodie Foster To Direct & Star In Remake Of Recent Cannes Award Winner ‘Woman At War’ at The Playlist.
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Sydney Pollack Doesn’t Have a Director Credit for ‘Amazing Grace’: The Long, Strange Story

Producer Alan Elliott has been nothing if not dogged in his pursuit of finishing and releasing Sydney Pollack’s 1972 documentary “Amazing Grace.” But he has not been entirely transparent about some of the wrangling that went on behind the scenes in order to get the movie made.

Back in 1972, a year after their massive hit “Woodstock,” Warner Bros. set out to produce another music documentary. Pink Floyd producer Joe Boyd (Drink Records) originally had a sophisticated concert cinematographer in mind to shoot another concert movie for Warners on the Grateful Dead. When it derailed, Warners moved on to the Aretha Franklin concert movie, which required someone who understood how to shoot multiple cameras with sync sound.

Boyd brought on James Signorelli as his director of photography, who shot “Super Fly” and went on to shoot the first 35 years of commercials for “Saturday Night Live.” One night, Boyd went out to
See full article at Indiewire »

Academy Considers No 2019 Oscars Host At All Following Kevin Hart Controversy

Academy Considers No 2019 Oscars Host At All Following Kevin Hart Controversy
With Kevin Hart no longer hosting the 91st Academy Awards next year, the Academy is reportedly “freaking out” as it rushes to find a replacement emcee for the 2019 ceremony. At least that’s according to a top comedy agent who spoke to Variety ahead of an Academy board meeting that’s set to discuss what to do with the hosting dilemma. Another insider told the publication there was no contingency plans in place by the Academy or broadcaster ABC, meaning there was no back-up host to fall on once Hart pulled out.

The Academy announced December 4 that Hart would be hosting the 2019 Oscars, but the confirmation was met with backlash online as homophobic jokes Hart made in the past began to resurface. Hart initially refused to apologize for the controversial jokes, but he eventually said he was sorry and announced he would not host the Oscars as to prevent the
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Top 10 Lists Deserve Your Respect: Why This Annual Tradition Matters

As the year comes to a close, Best Of lists come rolling out — and with them, their condemnation. Criticism is never been universally beloved, and the rise of user-created reviews has made questioning critics more commonplace and widespread. What better time to target critics than with year-end reviews?

These Top 10 or Top 25 or what-have-you lists can never please everybody. Distilling an entire year’s worth of anything into a discrete and definitive number is inevitably short-sighted; this endeavor fills critics, even Pulitzer Prize-winning ones, with dread. How can such a daunting task be handled with any semblance of authority?

And yet, lists will persist. Viewers have an vested interest because, as fans, they support these shows. Thus, they invite consumers to engage with both critics and creators, building a stronger community mindset. Here’s a few more reasons why Best Of lists are frivolous, essential, and not going anywhere.

1. They
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Video Essay. "The Apartment"

"The location is a character in its own right in this movie." How many times have you read a similar statement in a film review? How many times did you hear a screenwriter, actor or director utter words to that effect in a promotional interview? It is a tried and tested way to play up the setting (or set design) of a movie, a clichéd comment that has become a staple of both film writing and promotion.I don't know if the makers of The Apartment (1960) ever used the same line to describe the eponymous dwelling "in the west sixties, just half a block from Central Park."1 If they did, it worked. Because Alexandre Trauner and Edward G. Boyle won an Academy Award for Best Art Direction and Set Decoration in a Black-and-White Movie for their work.In this video essay, the apartment really does get the starring role. Jack Lemmon,
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Juliette Binoche to Serve as Jury President of 2019 Berlin Film Festival

Juliette Binoche to Serve as Jury President of 2019 Berlin Film Festival
The Berlin Film Festival has announced Juliette Binoche will serve as the jury president for the main competition at the 2019 event. Berlinale will celebrate its 69th year in 2019. Binoche has a long history with the Berlin Film Festival, with films such as “The Night Is Young” screening in competition, and others like “The Lovers on the Bridge” playing such sidebars as the Forum section. The actress won the Berlinale Silver Bear for Best Actress, as well as an Oscar, for her role in Anthony Minghella’s “The English Patient” in 1997.

“It means the world to me!” Binoche said in a statement, calling the role of jury president a “tremendous honor.” “I’m looking forward to this special rendezvous with the entire jury and will embrace my task with joy and care.”

“I’m very pleased that Juliette is president of the 2019 international jury,” added Berlinale director Dieter Kosslick. “The festival
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‘Doctor Who’ Season 11 Review: Standalone Episodes Failed the 13th Doctor

  • Indiewire
‘Doctor Who’ Season 11 Review: Standalone Episodes Failed the 13th Doctor
[Editor’s note: The following contains spoilers for “Doctor Who” Season 11, including the season finale, “The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos.”]

The season finale of “Doctor Who” began the way many episodes of the long-running British series do — the Doctor (Jodie Whittaker) and her faithful companions stepped onto an alien vista after receiving an alert that something strange was afoot. It ended the way many episodes do, as well — the Doctor and her friends returning to the Tardis, ready for another adventure.

And that’s perhaps the biggest disappointment of “The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos,” one that represents the flaws of the season as a whole. Billed as a grand conclusion and featuring a heroic moment for the Doctor as she and her friends stop a giant planet-killing beam from destroying the Earth, the episode tied up exactly one loose plot thread — and offered little other catharsis.

This isn’t really the last episode of the season,
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The Cinematographer Is In: Jordan Mintzer's "Conversations with Darius Khondji"

Delicatessen (1991)Growing up in the mid-to-late nineties, the pan-and-scan generation, I can remember the first time I saw a movie that was shot by Darius Khondji. Se7en, the cinematographer’s first American film and best-known work, looked scarier that any movie I’d seen other than The Shining; it was miasmic and biblically unclean, with deep shadows that seeped and stuck like gunk, rain pelting from a pre-apocalyptic sky. Then came The City of Lost Children, a dark storybook fantasy of Gilliam-esque camera angles, about a squalid port town lost in fog and a mad scientist’s lair built on piles out in a sludge-green sea. That one I watched maybe twenty times, always with sympathy for the disembodied brain Uncle Irvin and for Krank, the child-snatching villain who cannot dream.Later there was Alien: Resurrection, the video for Madonna’s “Frozen,” and The Ninth Gate, another movie I had
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Sight & Sound Names ‘Roma’ the Best Film of 2018

Sight & Sound Names ‘Roma’ the Best Film of 2018
Sight & Sound has unveiled its annual film poll, and the winner is unlikely to come as a surprise: “Roma,” whose awards-season dominance continues unabated. Alfonso Cuarón’s black-and-white drama, which won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival and has also been named the best film of the year by the New York Film Critics Circle and Los Angeles Film Critics Association, has emerged as 2018’s most well-received cinematic offering — at least among critics.

Rounding out the top five are Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread” (which wasn’t released in the UK until this year), Lee Chang-dong’s “Burning” (which was Lafca’s Best Picture runner-up), Paweł Pawlikowski’s “Cold War,” and Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed.”

More than 160 critics, programmers, and academics participated in the poll. The full results:

1. “Roma”

2. “Phantom Thread”

3. “Burning”

4. “Cold War”

5. “First Reformed”

6. “Leave No Trace”

7. “The Favourite”

= “You Were Never Really Here
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Jason Momoa Seems At Peace If Ben Affleck And Henry Cavill Leave The DC Universe

Following on the heels of the news that Amy Adams believes she is out as Lois Lane in the DC Universe and that she thinks Warner Bros. and DC Films are revamping Superman, “Aquaman” star Jason Momoa has weighed in on the revelations that Henry Cavill and Ben Affleck are likely out as Superman and Batman respectively. However, the actor doesn’t seem to know one way or another what their status is.

Continue reading Jason Momoa Seems At Peace If Ben Affleck And Henry Cavill Leave The DC Universe at The Playlist.
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‘Mary Poppins Returns’: Designing a Depression-Era London ‘Dipped in Reality’

‘Mary Poppins Returns’: Designing a Depression-Era London ‘Dipped in Reality’
The mandate for “Mary Poppins Returns” came straight from Oscar-winning production designer John Myhre: It had to look “London-y,” but also “dipped in reality.” That’s because, unlike Walt Disney’s idyllic world of 1910 in the original movie, the London here took place in 1934, the era of the Depression, or “The Slump,” as the British called it.

“When I first heard the opening song, ‘Underneath the Lovely London Sky,’ I saw this as a love letter to London,” said Myhre, but with a gritty twist in accordance with director Rob Marshall’s vision of becoming much more colorful with the return of the beloved nanny (Emily Blunt).

We glimpse London coming awake out of the fog, gliding by Parliament, Big Ben, St. Paul’s Cathedral, Tower Bridge, through some parks, before making our way to the familiar Cherry Tree Lane. “And we embraced London in the winter with the gray sky,
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