Indie News

No Strangers, Only Paradise: Meet Jim Jarmusch’s Repeat Collaborators

No Strangers, Only Paradise: Meet Jim Jarmusch’s Repeat Collaborators
Love him or hate him, Jim Jarmusch is one of the most fiercely individual filmmakers of his time. Whether it’s turned to New York slackers or the zombie apocalypse, his understated punk rock gaze is instantly recognizable. As he skips between genres without a care in the world, his films are always leisurely, thoughtful, and gleefully aware of their own hipness.

The other common denominator in his eclectic filmography is his collaborators. The director has assembled a team of offbeat musicians, serious actors, and acclaimed crew members that keep coming back to his projects.

With the release of “The Dead Don’t Die,” we looked back at Jarmusch’s past collaborators who returned for the film.
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‘Game of Thrones’: Lena Headey Admits She Wanted a Better Ending for Queen Cersei

‘Game of Thrones’: Lena Headey Admits She Wanted a Better Ending for Queen Cersei
[Editor’s note: The following post contains spoilers for “Game of Thrones” Season 8.]

When HBO’s seminal fantasy series “Game of Thrones” wrapped up its truncated final season last month, the show inevitably ended with a slew of deaths for some of its signature characters, including Lena Headey’s embattled Queen Cersei, who ended her eight-season run in tragic fashion.

Despite making a last minute attempt to escape King’s Landing, suddenly turned into a flamed-out battleground after years of threats, Headey’s Cersei ultimately perished in the bowels of the city, clinging to her brother and lover Jaime as everything literally collapsed around them. It was quick, sad, and a touch confusing, and perhaps not the best way to send out two of the series’ most complex characters.

In a new interview with The Guardian, Headey herself admitted that she has her her “own gripes” with the way the series wrapped. She told the outlet, “I invested as
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‘Bond 25’ Official Photo Shows Injured Daniel Craig Preparing to Return to Spy Thriller

‘Bond 25’ Official Photo Shows Injured Daniel Craig Preparing to Return to Spy Thriller
Looks like James Bond is nearly ready to get back into the spy action. In a newly posted photo on James Bond’s official Twitter page, franchise star Daniel Craig is pictured working out, even as his injured left ankle continues to heal up in a walking cast.

The caption, however, does hint that Craig is nearly ready to get back to shooting the Cary Fukunaga-directed Bond 25 soon, adding that he’s “prepping for shooting next week.”

For a production that’s been waylaid by two different accidents in less than a month, it’s finally a piece of good news. In May, Craig suffered an injury on the set of the film that led to the announcement that he would be undergoing minor ankle surgery, though production on the film continued as Craig underwent said surgery and underwent two additional weeks of rehabilitation.

Craig’s accident was only the first to hit the production.
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Quotes From the ‘Deadwood’ Cast That Will Inspire You to Watch

Technically, you don’t have to watch all three seasons of HBO’s “Deadwood,” the legendary, canceled-too-soon series from singular television visionary David Milch before viewing this year’s towering TV movie that served as a final chapter in a narrative that deserved a proper ending.

But you’re not the kind of monster who reads the end of a book first, are you? Of course not. With just 36 hour-longish episodes – all available to stream on HBO Go, along with the movie – you could binge the entirety of the series over a long weekend. Or make it a leisurely viewing and spread your watch over an entire week!

And if our word isn’t enough for you, here are a few alluring anecdotes IndieWire exclusively got from the returning cast about the original series, the new movie, and working with each other to encourage you to make “Deadwood” your viewing destination this summer.
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Video Sundays: Victorian Voyeurism

Esmé Collings's Victorian Lady in Her Boudoir (1896) is the oldest surviving British erotic film. The film, presented here, has been made publicly available by the British Film Institute (BFI) as part of its Pleasure Principle collection. And per the title of the collection, the magic of Victorian Lady in Her Boudoir lies in the pleasure of projection—namely, that of the spectator whose desire lies beneath the layers of clothing that are stripped away, one article at a time. The woman, whose name is unknown, appears to speak as she removes the clothes, staring directly at the camera as she struggles to remove a sock. Though the camera is still, our eyes wander. To make a spectacle of the act of undressing, within an English context and regarding the Collings film, recalls a particular tradition of commodified peeping. Scholar Kirstyn Leuner writes that the history of the dressing room is
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‘This Changes Everything’ Trailer: Meryl Streep and Jessica Chastain in Hollywood Gender Discrimination Doc

‘This Changes Everything’ Trailer: Meryl Streep and Jessica Chastain in Hollywood Gender Discrimination Doc
As it gears up for its theatrical release after a successful and extensive festival tour, “This Changes Everything” is giving a taste of the many big names set to speak out about Hollywood’s long-standing gender problem in the enlightening and wide-ranging new documentary.

Directed by Tom Donahue, the documentary features commentary and interviews from a number of Hollywood luminaries, including Geena Davis, Meryl Streep, Natalie Portman, Taraji P. Henson, Reese Witherspoon, Cate Blanchett, Jill Soloway, Shonda Rhimes, Yara Shahidi, Chloe Moretz, Amandla Stenberg, Alan Alda, Sandra Oh, Anita Hill, Natalie Portman, Jessica Chastain, Rose McGowan, Judd Apatow, and Rosario Dawson.

Per the film’s official synopsis: “Told first-hand by some of Hollywood’s leading voices behind and in front of the camera, ‘This Changes Everything’ is a feature-length documentary that uncovers what is beneath one of the most confounding dilemmas in the entertainment industry— the underrepresentation and misrepresentation of women.
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‘In the Heights’: Musical Creator Lin-Manuel Miranda Joins Film Version in Small Role

‘In the Heights’: Musical Creator Lin-Manuel Miranda Joins Film Version in Small Role
Powerhouse Lin-Manuel Miranda may not be returning to play the role he originated in his Broadway hit and Tony winner “In the Heights,” but he will be taking on a small role in director Jon M. Chu’s big screen treatment of the early aughts musical. On Friday, Miranda tweeted that he will be taking on the part of Piragüero, also known as “Piragua Guy,” in the upcoming film version of his first musical hit.

Piragüero is the owner of a piragua (a Puerto Rican shaved ice dessert) stand, and is trying to literally “scrap by” even when faced by the encroachment of heavy-hitter ice cream behemoth Mister Softee. When the show opened on Broadway in 2008, Miranda — who created the show and wrote its music and lyrics — played the lead role and narrator, Usnavi de la Vega, who will be played by Anthony Ramos in the film version.

The New
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Lena Dunham Returns to HBO to Direct International High-Finance Series ‘Industry’

Lena Dunham Returns to HBO to Direct International High-Finance Series ‘Industry’
Lena Dunham is returning to HBO for a brand-new series. Variety reports that the “Girls” and “Camping” creator is heading back to the cable outfit to direct and executive produce “Industry,” an eight-part series that will center around “a group of twenty-somethings breaking into the world of international finance.”

Created by Mickey Down and Konrad Kay, who previously worked in the international finance arena themselves, the show will follow “a group of young graduates competing for a limited set of permanent positions at a top investment bank in London. The boundaries between colleague, friend, lover, and enemy soon blur as they immerse themselves in a company culture defined by sex, drugs, and ego as well as deals and dividends.”

Dunham will direct the pilot episode of “Industry” and will executive produce the entire series alongside Kay and Down. Variety reports that there “are currently no plans for her to appear in the series.
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I Will Always Love You: Amy Dotson’s BAMcinemafest Speech

Amy Dotson, who recently departed her position as Deputy Director and Head of Programming at Ifp, Filmmaker‘s publisher, is headed this fall to Portland, where she will step into the role of Director of the Northwest Film Center and Film and New Media Curator at the Portland Art Museum. Today she gave a speech at the day of industry talks at BAMcinemafest and kindly offered the text to Filmmaker to publish below. Lotta change in the air, ya’ll. So much has happened of late. As some of you may know, I’m on the precipice of new adventures. That said, I’m […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

I Will Always Love You: Amy Dotson’s BAMcinemafest Speech

Amy Dotson, who recently departed her position as Deputy Director and Head of Programming at Ifp, Filmmaker‘s publisher, is headed this fall to Portland, where she will step into the role of Director of the Northwest Film Center and Film and New Media Curator at the Portland Art Museum. Today she gave a speech at the day of industry talks at BAMcinemafest and kindly offered the text to Filmmaker to publish below. Lotta change in the air, ya’ll. So much has happened of late. As some of you may know, I’m on the precipice of new adventures. That said, I’m […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Frankie Drake Mysteries’ Review: Jazz Age Private Eyes Make Crime-Fighting Feminist and Frothy

Summer is usually the time for tea of the iced variety, but if one is into cozy murder mysteries, a warm cuppa will do just as well to accompany the influx of detective shows from overseas or across the border. “Frankie Drake Mysteries” arrives on Ovation’s shores by way of Canada this Saturday, and it’s the entertaining but not overly taxing fare that is best consumed during these warmer months.

Set in 1920s Toronto, the series follows in the footsteps of shows like “Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries” from Down Under, and is created, written, and directed by women. Besides taking place in the same era, albeit on the other side of the globe, “Frankie Drake Mysteries” also features an independent-minded woman who flouts gender norms and solves crimes that the police often overlook. The titular Frankie (Lauren Lee Smith) is daring and aspirational for the time; she wears trousers,
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‘Frozen 2’: Disney Shows Off New Look at Much-Hyped Sequel, Hints at Deeper Story

‘Frozen 2’: Disney Shows Off New Look at Much-Hyped Sequel, Hints at Deeper Story
When Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck’s much-hyped “Frozen” sequel opens later this year, the Disney animated offering will likely answer some lingering questions leftover from the original smash hit. While early looks at the film have promised to explain the origin of Princess Elsa’s wintry powers, a new presentation from Disney brass at the Annecy International Animated Film Festival hints that the story is even more wide-ranging than previously disclosed. Like many Disney features, much of it might hinge on Elsa’s parentage.

Variety reports that during a special event held at Annecy’s lakeside Bonlieu Theater, “Frozen 2” head of animation Becky Bresee and head of effects animation Marlon West shared a slew of new details about the film, including three new pictures (which you can see throughout this article) and a key note on time: the film will pick up three years after the original wrapped.

Bresee
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Capturing Myth: Close-Up on Steven Soderbergh’s “Che”

Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Steven Soderbergh's Che (2008), shown as The Argentine and Guerrilla, are playing in June and July in the United States.Half way through Steven Soderbergh’s two-part, four-and-a-half-hour epic Che, ABC News journalist Lisa Howard asks the Argentine doctor-turned-revolutionary how he feels about “being a symbol.” The question ricochets off the sleek interiors of a New York room, 1964—the year Guevara addressed the United Nations on the threat U.S. imperialism posed to world peace. But in Soderbergh’s biopic, it plays over images from January 2, 1959—the day Che, having conquered the city of Santa Clara, raced to Havana to reunite with Fidel Castro and celebrate “the end of the war, and the start of the [Cuban] revolution.” It’s a choice that makes for a peculiar dialectic: a man who by the 1960s had already become a global icon
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‘Dark Phoenix’ Director Simon Kinberg on Film’s Failures: ‘It Didn’t Connect Enough With Audiences’

‘Dark Phoenix’ Director Simon Kinberg on Film’s Failures: ‘It Didn’t Connect Enough With Audiences’
Simon Kinberg isn’t burying his head in the sand. After debuting his feature filmmaking debut, the critically savaged and drastically underperforming “Dark Phoenix” last week, Kinberg popped up on KCRW’s “The Business” (via EW) to open up about his perceived failures on the X-Men feature.

“It clearly is a movie that didn’t connect with audiences that didn’t see it, it didn’t connect enough with audiences that did see it. So that’s on me,” Kinberg said.

The film debuted last weekend during the crush of the summer movie-going season, where it pulled in only $33 million in domestic dollars, a far cry from the receipts of recent X-Men features like “X-Men: Apocalypse” and “Logan.” With an estimated $200 million production cost (and that’s before marketing) and uninspiring foreign numbers, the film will likely go down as the franchise’s biggest bust ever.

And that’s to
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars 2020: Best Documentary Feature Predictions

Oscars 2020: Best Documentary Feature Predictions
January’s Sundance Film Festival is the most effective launchpad for any documentary Oscar hopeful. With a field overloaded by competitive non-fiction, it’s essential to get a head start, a distributor, an early release date and build a profile before narrative features grab the media attention in an overcrowded fall.

Some high-profile non-fiction features, like Jimmy Chin and Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi’s box-office star and eventual Oscar-winner “Free Solo,” break out of fall festivals like Telluride, Toronto, and New York. However, titles like those are the outliers.

Sundance 2018 yielded four out of the five 2019 Oscar nominees: $14 million-grossing Ruth Bader Ginsburg doc “Rbg,” Sundance breakthrough filmmaker prize-winner Bing Liu’s “Minding the Gap,” which follows three young skateboarders in the Rust Belt, photographer RaMell Ross’ languorous poetic portrait of a time and place, “Hale County: This Morning, This Evening,” and Talal Derki’s Sundance World Documentary Grand Jury Prize-winner “Of Fathers and Sons.
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Franco Zeffirelli, Legendary Director of ‘Romeo and Juliet,’ Dies at 96

Franco Zeffirelli, Legendary Director of ‘Romeo and Juliet,’ Dies at 96
Legendary Italian filmmaker Franco Zeffirelli has passed away at the age of 96. His son Luciano told The Sun his father died at home at noon on Saturday. He said, “He had suffered for a while, but he left in a peaceful way.”

The excess-loving Zeffirelli was best known in the states for his work on such lush Shakespearean adaptations as his debut feature, the 1967 take on “The Taming of the Shrew,” starring Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, which he followed with his popular 1968 version of “Romeo and Juliet,” which starred Leonard Whiting and Olivia Hussey and was nominated for Best Director and Best Picture.

After the success of his first two films, Zeffirelli moved into more religious work, including the St. Francis of Assisi-centric “Brother Sun, Sister Moon” and his still-popular mini-series “Jesus of Nazareth.” He directed more than two dozen films, and frequently worked with majors stars Elizabeth Taylor,
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‘Jett’ Review: Carla Gugino Shines in a Stylish Crime Show That’s More Solid Than Surprising

‘Jett’ Review: Carla Gugino Shines in a Stylish Crime Show That’s More Solid Than Surprising
Daisy “Jett” Kowalski (Carla Gugino) is someone whose face people remember. A silent, meticulous thief who can translate those skills into something more outwardly elegant when necessary, Jett stumbles across multiple past associates along her way to getting out of a life of crime for good. But by necessity, “Jett” is more than just its title character. Watching the new Cinemax series, written and directed by Sebastian Gutierrez, is watching Jett wind through a thinly disguised world of scumbags, well-intentioned thieves, and people caught in between both camps. It’s filled with characters and situations we’ve seen before, but her journey makes that familiar trip worth it.

Despite her criminal prowess, Jett isn’t infallible. Gutierrez wisely stays away from making his central character an impervious angel of vengeance, even if there are some sequences that do tend in that direction. The most compelling moments of the series find
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What to See at the 2019 BAMcinemafest

Following its very good opening night film — Lulu Wang’s The Farewell (also Filmmaker’s forthcoming Summer issue cover) — BAMcinemafest the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s essential early summer fest, is underway. This year’s edition is typical of the fest: a well-curated and relatively compact mix of recent festival standouts, a world premiere or two, and assorted other programs, including tomorrow’s day-long (and free) program of industry panels presented in collaboration with Ifp. The festival runs until June 22, and for those in or headed to Brooklyn, here are some recommendations from us at Filmmaker. So Pretty. Jessie Jeffrey Dunn Rovinelli’s […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

What to See at the 2019 BAMcinemafest

Following its very good opening night film — Lulu Wang’s The Farewell (also Filmmaker’s forthcoming Summer issue cover) — BAMcinemafest the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s essential early summer fest, is underway. This year’s edition is typical of the fest: a well-curated and relatively compact mix of recent festival standouts, a world premiere or two, and assorted other programs, including tomorrow’s day-long (and free) program of industry panels presented in collaboration with Ifp. The festival runs until June 22, and for those in or headed to Brooklyn, here are some recommendations from us at Filmmaker. So Pretty. Jessie Jeffrey Dunn Rovinelli’s […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Russian Doll’: Leslye Headland Breaks Down How You Build A Comedy Classic [Interview]

‘Russian Doll’: Leslye Headland Breaks Down How You Build A Comedy Classic [Interview]
If you have not binged on the marvel that is the first season of “Russian Doll” you’ve really missed out. The Netflix comedy series follows Nadia (Natasha Lyonne), a New York City software engineer who finds herself reliving her 36th birthday over and over in a “Groundhog Day” inspired series of time loops where she keeps getting killed again and again. Unable to get out of the cycle, she’s thrown for a mental loop when she meets Alan (Charlie Barnett), a man in her neighborhood who is stuck in his own series of loops.

Continue reading ‘Russian Doll’: Leslye Headland Breaks Down How You Build A Comedy Classic [Interview] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »
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